Seabird Centre boat trips

Seabird Centre boat trips

The Harbour North Berwick EH39 4SS T: 01620 890202 W: www.seabird.org Scottish Seabird Centre The Scottish Seabird Centre offer a fantastic range of boat trips, from March to October, with something to suit people of all ages. Look out for different wildlife every month from puffins and seals to gannets and dolphins. These trips are very popular and booking in advance is strongly advised via www.seabird.org Three Islands Seabird Seafari – 1 hour 15 minutes, on board the rigid inflatable boat. See The Lamb, Craigleith and the Bass Rock (age 7+) Seabird Seafari Cruise – 1 hour, on board the catamaran. See Craigleith and the Bass Rock (all ages) Isle of May Landing – approx 4 hours, on board the rigid inflatable boat (age 7+) Bass Rock Landing – approx 5 hours, travelling via fishing boat (age 8+) Forth Ferry – approx 45 minutes each way. Departures from North Berwick and Anstruther on board the catamaran (all...
North Berwick Harbour

North Berwick Harbour

North Berwick Harbour: The Rise and Fall of Fishing Built around 1150, North Berwick Harbour has served as a ferry service, a fishing resort and a useful import for materials such as wood and iron since its first documented record of existence in 1177.  Remaining unchanged today, the town crest is greatly symbolic of this significant centre of town.  When North Berwick received the Royal Charter and became a Royal Burgh in 1373, it was decided that the design of a ferryboat would be incorporated into the town crest, representing the early ferry services to Earlsferry in Fife, transporting up to 10,000 pilgrims each year. In 1794, the focus of the harbour changed from pilgrimage ferries to fishing and exports.  Although the new arrival of the railways service from Edinburgh to North Berwick soon dominated the trade of crucial goods, including wheat, barley, iron, wood and steel, the focus on fishing allowed fishermen to send their catches to locations all over the UK.  It was not long until two shorter piers were constructed in order to accommodate larger vessels transporting the fresh fish.  The first of these was the North Pier which lasted from 1811 until a treacherous storm caused it to collapse in 1898.  The second of the piers was the Galloway Pier which lasted from 1877 until 1840 when it was demolished due to lack of traffic during the war period.  Due to the lack of appeal in rebuilding a larger pier, a smaller concrete pier exists in its place today. (article supplied by Alison Wright, NBHS Pupil...
Law Formation

Law Formation

North Berwick Law Formation, Historical use and why we have Whalebones With its panoramic views of Edinburgh Castle, the Forth Road Bridge, and the beautiful Fife coastline, North Berwick law is one of the main tourist attractions in the quaint seaside town, bringing hundreds of tourists from all over the world every year.  While many walkers and hill climbers venture to the top of the ingenious rock every day, some are yet to be dazzled by the spectacular history of this igneous rock.  The North Berwick Law was formed during the Carboniferous era, at the time of glaciations, when the sea level was low and there were high extinction rates among animals and plants, evidently caused by climate change.  Ultimately, the Law is the formation of a plug, which proved as a mouth of the initial volcano, choking it with its own hot ash and molten lava.  During this period of time, North Berwick, along with the rest of Scotland, was covered in a frozen glacial blanket, which over time deteriorated the volcanic ash below, resulting in the visibility of the volcanic plug today. While today the famous landmark is merely used as a location for hill walkers and sightseers, over 18 hut circles can be seen on the premises dating from over 2000 years ago, proving that in years gone by, local people lived and farmed on the Law.  Approaching the highest point of the volcanic rock stands the ruins of a stone building which served as a station during the Napoleonic Wars in the 1800s.  Standing at 187 metres, the North Berwick Law is distinctly famous for...
GoForth Tours

GoForth Tours

3e Balderstone’s Wynd North Berwick EH39 4JH T: 07814 666082 E: Info@goforthtours.co.uk W: www.goforthtours.co.uk GoForth Tours Nobody knows their home turf like a local.  And nobody knows the North Berwick area better than GoForth. The ‘North Neuk’s’ 20 miles of rocky coves and hidden beaches has everything–towering castles and elegant estates, birdsong peace and teeming wildlife, supersonic airliners and vintage cars.  Not sure which to pick?  Try the hour sampler first. Be prepared for something different.  In spacious luxury with only 6 guests, you will be chauffeured by a very knowledgeable local sharing insider stories and hidden corners, taking time to stop and let you...
The Lodge Grounds

The Lodge Grounds

North Berwick EH39 4 The Lodge Grounds The Lodge Grounds are located in the centre of North Berwick and were created in the 17th century by the Dalyrymple family.  In 1939 they became a public park when North Berwick Town Council bought both the grounds and the Lodge.  In 2008, the refurbished grounds were opened by Sir Hew Hamilton-Dalyrmple. Entrance to the split-level park is from Quality Street.  The lower park is a formal garden with an aviary.  The upper ‘early Victorian’ park has wide open spaces, mature trees, lavender garden, wild gardens, great views of North Berwick Law and the Bass Rock, and a children’s play area suitable for all...