Coastal Communities Museum

Coastal Communities Museum

Photography by Ian Goodall, www.northberwickphotos.com School Road, North Berwick, East Lothian, EH39 4JU T: 01620 894313 W: www.coastalmuseum.org E: hello@coastalmuseum.org Coastal Communities Museum Our volunteer-run museum brings 10,000 years of heritage and culture of the local towns and villages of this coastal area alive with exhibits and activities for all ages from pre-school to pensioners. Exhibits and exhibition boards are regularly changed to reflect a new theme or a different focus – check out the www.coastalmuseum.org for what’s on – or drop in and see for yourself.  ‘Treasured Memories’ (opens on 1 April 2017). It will delight the eye and take you on a trip down memory lane.  Find out what inspired Robert Louis Stevenson, this maker of myths and teller of tales.  See the local places that enabled him to recreate the sights, sounds and smells of this coastal area in his stories. The museum is situated above the town library, but accessed by a lift or stairs.  It is within a few minutes walk of the town centre and in easy reach of local car parks.  Whether you are a local or a visitor to the Coastal Communities Museum, “your curiosity is welcome”. Opening Times: 11:00am – 4:00pm Opening Days April :  Wednesday – Sunday (closed Mondays and Tuesdays) May/June:  Saturday and Sunday ONLY July/August:  Wednesday – Sunday (closed Mondays and Tuesdays) September/October/November:  Saturday and Sunday ONLY plus all Public Holiday Mondays....
Seabird Centre boat trips

Seabird Centre boat trips

The Harbour North Berwick EH39 4SS T: 01620 890202 W: www.seabird.org Scottish Seabird Centre The Scottish Seabird Centre offer a fantastic range of boat trips, from March to October, with something to suit people of all ages. Look out for different wildlife every month from puffins and seals to gannets and dolphins. These trips are very popular and booking in advance is strongly advised via www.seabird.org Three Islands Seabird Seafari – 1 hour 15 minutes, on board the rigid inflatable boat. See The Lamb, Craigleith and the Bass Rock (age 7+) Seabird Seafari Cruise – 1 hour, on board the catamaran. See Craigleith and the Bass Rock (all ages) Isle of May Landing – approx 4 hours, on board the rigid inflatable boat (age 7+) Bass Rock Landing – approx 5 hours, travelling via fishing boat (age 8+) Forth Ferry – approx 45 minutes each way. Departures from North Berwick and Anstruther on board the catamaran (all...
Spa and Leisure Club at Macdonald Marine Hotel

Spa and Leisure Club at Macdonald Marine Hotel

Cromwell Road North Berwick East Lothian EH39 4LZ Open Monday to Sunday, 09:30 – 20:00 (later treatment times available with prior notice) T: 0844 879 9130 E: customer.services@Macdonald-hotels.co.uk W: www.macdonaldhotels.co.uk Spa and Leisure Club at Macdonald Marine Hotel The Macdonald Marine Hotel & Spa is perfect for a relaxing break from the ever-growing pressures of daily life.  Their Spa provides you with an equal balance of luxury and tranquility; with trained experts at your disposal, you can afford to leave it up to them to help you relax and unwind.     Steam rooms, saunas & pool     Full range of massage therapies     Rejuvenating facials and makeovers     Manicures, pedicures, waxing and tinting     Tailored spa packages for couples and...
North Berwick Harbour

North Berwick Harbour

North Berwick Harbour: The Rise and Fall of Fishing Built around 1150, North Berwick Harbour has served as a ferry service, a fishing resort and a useful import for materials such as wood and iron since its first documented record of existence in 1177.  Remaining unchanged today, the town crest is greatly symbolic of this significant centre of town.  When North Berwick received the Royal Charter and became a Royal Burgh in 1373, it was decided that the design of a ferryboat would be incorporated into the town crest, representing the early ferry services to Earlsferry in Fife, transporting up to 10,000 pilgrims each year. In 1794, the focus of the harbour changed from pilgrimage ferries to fishing and exports.  Although the new arrival of the railways service from Edinburgh to North Berwick soon dominated the trade of crucial goods, including wheat, barley, iron, wood and steel, the focus on fishing allowed fishermen to send their catches to locations all over the UK.  It was not long until two shorter piers were constructed in order to accommodate larger vessels transporting the fresh fish.  The first of these was the North Pier which lasted from 1811 until a treacherous storm caused it to collapse in 1898.  The second of the piers was the Galloway Pier which lasted from 1877 until 1840 when it was demolished due to lack of traffic during the war period.  Due to the lack of appeal in rebuilding a larger pier, a smaller concrete pier exists in its place today. (article supplied by Alison Wright, NBHS Pupil...
Law Formation

Law Formation

North Berwick Law Formation, Historical use and why we have Whalebones With its panoramic views of Edinburgh Castle, the Forth Road Bridge, and the beautiful Fife coastline, North Berwick law is one of the main tourist attractions in the quaint seaside town, bringing hundreds of tourists from all over the world every year.  While many walkers and hill climbers venture to the top of the ingenious rock every day, some are yet to be dazzled by the spectacular history of this igneous rock.  The North Berwick Law was formed during the Carboniferous era, at the time of glaciations, when the sea level was low and there were high extinction rates among animals and plants, evidently caused by climate change.  Ultimately, the Law is the formation of a plug, which proved as a mouth of the initial volcano, choking it with its own hot ash and molten lava.  During this period of time, North Berwick, along with the rest of Scotland, was covered in a frozen glacial blanket, which over time deteriorated the volcanic ash below, resulting in the visibility of the volcanic plug today. While today the famous landmark is merely used as a location for hill walkers and sightseers, over 18 hut circles can be seen on the premises dating from over 2000 years ago, proving that in years gone by, local people lived and farmed on the Law.  Approaching the highest point of the volcanic rock stands the ruins of a stone building which served as a station during the Napoleonic Wars in the 1800s.  Standing at 187 metres, the North Berwick Law is distinctly famous for...